ADA Emphasize Importance of Flossing and Interdental Cleaners

August 18, 2016

Recent news reports question whether existing scientific research support oral health benefits associated with flossing. The bottom line for dentists and patients is that a lack of strong evidence doesn’t equate to a lack of effectiveness. As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to advise their patients on oral hygiene practices because they know their patient’s oral health status and health history.

 

The news story also implies that by not including flossing in the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines, the government has changed its stance on flossing, however, this is simply not the case. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) made a deliberate decision to focus on food and nutrient intake (i.e., added sugar).

The Dietary Guidelines have no bearing on the longstanding recommendation from the Surgeon General, the CDC, and other health agencies to clean between teeth daily. In fact, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reaffirms the importance of flossing in an Aug. 4 statement to the ADA, which states:


“Flossing is an important oral hygiene practice. Tooth decay and gum disease can develop when plaque is allowed to build up on teeth and along the gum line. Professional cleaning, tooth brushing, and cleaning between teeth (flossing and the use of other tools such as interdental brushes) have been shown to disrupt and remove plaque. At HHS, NIH’s National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), CDC’s Division of Oral Health and Healthy People 2020 have additional information and resources about efforts to address and improve oral health.”

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), interdental cleaners such as floss are an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums. Cleaning between teeth removes plaque that can lead to cavities or gum disease from the areas where a toothbrush can’t reach. Interdental cleaning is proven to help remove debris between teeth that can contribute to plaque buildup.

 

More than 500 bacterial species can be found in plaque; some are good and some are bad for your mouth. Together with food debris, water and other components, the plaque buildup around the teeth and on the gum line will contribute to disease in teeth and gums.

 

Whether you use floss or another interdental cleaner is a personal preference, but it’s very important to understand the proper technique for each tool so that it is effective. Patients should talk to their dentists about how to use interdental cleaners to ensure efficacy.

 

To maintain good oral health, the American Dental Association continues to recommend brushing for two minutes twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, cleaning between teeth once a day with an interdental cleaner and regular dental visits advised by your dentist.

 

Sources:

http://www.ada.org

http://www.mckaysmilldental.com

 

 

 

Please reload

Featured Posts

Laser Teeth Whitening

October 1, 2017

1/10
Please reload

Recent Posts

February 18, 2019

December 5, 2017

October 1, 2017

April 9, 2017

Please reload

Follow Us
Please reload

Archive
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

(610) 918-1710

Office Hours:

Monday: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Tuesday: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Wednesday: 12:00 pm  - 7:00 pm (Glenmoore Office)

Thursday: 10:00 am - 7:00 pm 

Friday: 8:00 am - 1:00 pm (Glenmoore Office)

Every Other Saturday: 8:00 am - 1:00 pm

exton dental care map, 331 west boot Road, west chester, pa
GENERAL INFO
West Chester Dental Services
Wednesdays and Fridays: Our Glenmoore office open.   Call Glenmoore Office at (610) 410-2772 or visit us www.glenmooredentalcare.com
  • google-plus-logo
  • facebook-logo
  • Yelp-Logo
  • hg
  • yp
  • foursqaure
  • bing
  • Yellowbook
  • mc
  • mq
  • google-plus-logo
  • facebook-logo
  • Yelp-Logo
  • hg
  • yp
  • foursqaure
  • bing
  • Yellowbook
  • mc
  • mq